News from UP

Announcement of the Doctoral Student Grant Competition at Palacký University Olomouc

News: Faculty of Science - Wed, 15/09/2021 - 08:08

The Rector of Palacký University Olomouc announces a call under the internal university-wide Doctoral Student Grant Competition.

 The Doctoral Student Grant Competition aims to support one-year research grants implemented by full-time or part-time students of doctoral study programmes at Palacký University Olomouc to increase the level of their knowledge and help them improve the skills necessary for their future careers in research and development. 

The doctoral student grant competition is financed from the funds of the Operational Program Research, Development and Education under the project “Improving schematics of Doctoral student grant competition and their pilot implementation”, Reg. No. CZ.02.2.69/0.0/0.0/19_073/0016713.

Proposals must be submitted until 27 October 2021 (4 pm). Student grant proposals are submitted only electronically and in English, through a web app available at granty.upol.cz. Detailed information can be found in the attached document.

Categories: News from UP

Do nanomaterials harm living cells? We know how to test this reliably

News: Faculty of Science - Mon, 13/09/2021 - 13:00

“We found that interactions between carbon nanomaterials and chemicals that are part of standard toxicology test procedures can negatively affect the test results. Indeed, the values obtained for the cell viability did not reflect the interaction of the nanomaterials with the cells but the effect of those materials on the fluorescence properties of the dyes of the relevant tests. Therefore, in the protocol for the flow cytometry method, we used more control samples to help us detect these negative effects. Based on additional controls, we have created a new approach for evaluating this method that overcomes the interaction with fluorescent dyes and allows reliable in vitro testing of carbon nanomaterials toxicity,” explained the first author of the study, Tomáš Malina.

The work is a significant contribution to the field of nanotoxicology. It is a ground-breaking field of research since nanomaterials cannot be studied as common chemical compounds primarily because of their complex behaviour. This is manifested by the multi-level interaction between nanomaterials and living cells.

“Any research aimed at the interaction of nanomaterials with living cells or biological systems is generally extremely important and has a strong impact on the future real-world applications of nanomaterials. Carbon nanomaterials, whose applications are growing enormously in a number of areas, including biomedicine, should be reliably tested. We want to offer our newly developed strategy to the entire community of carbon research,” added Poláková. The work builds on years of research by a team from CATRIN-RCPTM into the interaction of biological systems with carbon nanomaterials of various dimensions, such as carbon dots, graphene derivatives or its nanosilver composites. The expansion of the scientific cooperation opens up further possibilities for assessing the safety of nanomaterials used in practice.

Reference:

T. Malina, K. Polakova, C. Hirsch, L. Svoboda, R. Zboril, Toxicity of Carbon Nanomaterials—Towards Reliable Viability Assessment via New Approach in Flow Cytometry. International Journal of Molecular Sciences 22 (2021), 7750.

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Become part of the pool of potential AURORA Doctoral Committee Members!

News: Faculty of Science - Tue, 31/08/2021 - 10:23

Reviewer, counterspeaker, committee member wanted for a doctoral thesis? Become part of the pool of potential AURORA Doctoral Committee Members!

Gain international experience in doctoral education and establish contacts with reseachers from AURORA partner institutions for further collaborations. Sign up at the link below:

https://eveeno.com/aurora-doctoral-committee 

All entries will be presented as a pool containing the research area and contact details of researchers willing to support a doctoral thesis evaluation at another AURORA university. The reseachers can review a dissertation or participate in a dissertation defence in a specific role (depending on the institutions regulations). The pool will only provide the relevant data. All legal and organisational issues must be clarified by the persons involved on a case-by-case basis.

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Scientists in Olomouc tested a special device for analyzing plant properties in field conditions

News: Faculty of Science - Thu, 19/08/2021 - 08:00

Plant ScreenTM Field System mobile phenotyping device has been tested by PSI for the first time in field conditions in cooperation with scientists from the Olomouc workplace of the Crop Research Institute and the Czech Advanced Technologies and Research Institute - CATRIN Palacký University. In a calendula covered field, experts collected data on the growth and flowering dynamics of 32 genotypes of this medicinal plant. The aim of cooperation between the three institutions is to enhance the procedure for obtaining data about the content of biologically active substances by non-invasive methods based on the analysis of spectral properties of plants.

"Lighting conditions change in different parts of the day and year. We must learn to normalize the measurements so that the data is transferable regardless of the lighting conditions. The obtained information about the color properties of the vegetation, its height, density, amount of biomass, color, homogeneity of the stand and the like are important for further research," said Petr Tarkowski, head of Olomouc branch of Crop Research Institute, who also works at CATRIN.

The mobile device was operating in a field where the research institute had planted 32 representative genotypes of calendula. In addition to automatic measurements, the researchers also measured some parameters manually on this unique sample so that they could compare the results with each other. They then perform a chemical analysis of the collected material, determine the composition of the substances and evaluate whether and eventually how this composition is reflected in the color of the flowers.

Working in the field in Olomouc also served as a test for PSI company, which is learning to use the Plant ScreenTM Field System in practice. In addition to biological material, the Crop Research Institute also provided knowledge in the field of morphology and calendula cultivation, while researchers from CATRIN provided knowledge from the connection between phenomics and metabolomics or experience with data evaluation.

"Palacký University has thus supported its activities in the Czech Plant Phenotyping Platform and contributed further towards reaching the Czech roadmap of large research infrastructures administered by the Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports of the Czech Republic. It is great that the institutions have joined forces in this way in order to improve the procedure for other potential clients,“ said Lukáš Spíchal, an expert in plant phenotyping from CATRIN.

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The GloKnoCo project points to the potential of sport in social and cultural development

News: Faculty of Science - Thu, 12/08/2021 - 08:00

Sport not only strengthens the body and spirit, but can also play an important role in social and cultural development or in solving serious social problems. The three-year Global Sport for Development and Peace Knowledge Collaborative (GloKnoCo) project, in which the Department of Development & Environmental Studies of the Faculty of Science together with the Faculty of Physical Culture is involved, aims to point out this hitherto seldom used potential of sports activities.

“We want to show students how to work with topics such as poverty, ecology, social exclusion, diseases and humanitarian disasters through sport. The project takes advantage of the fact that both children and adults enjoy movement and playing sports. With the help of sports activities, they can learn more about these topics under the guidance of instructors. While sometimes participation itself is a partial solution to a problem, it gets children ‘off the street’, other times participants may still be learning solutions in movement games. Sport thus contributes to social change in society,” said Simona Šafaříková from the Department of Development & Environmental Studies.

Selected students get acquainted with the issue from a theoretical point of view and then also in practical workshops. In international teams, they design fictitious sports development projects led by non-profit organisations. This year’s conference, which took place online due to the coronavirus pandemic, was also attended by Daniel Rybníček from the Department of Development & Environmental Studies. “Participation in the GloKnoCo project brought me a lot of new knowledge and experience. It was very interesting to see experts from Palacký University and foreign universities, as well as representatives of non-profit organizations, use sport to develop and fulfil the agenda of the Sustainable Development Goals and reduce inequality within and between countries. We were introduced to specific examples from around the world as well as specific tools that organisations use to solve given problems. The seminars were accompanied by interesting and creative group activities, where we tried to create new scenarios and projects that could be applied in the practice of sports for development,” explained the student.

In addition to Palacký University, project partners are the University of Brighton (GB) and Paderborn University (D), as well as several organisations active in the field of sports for development. “Last but not least, within the project we strive for rapprochement and cooperation between the academic and non-profit sectors. In other words, researchers at universities have a lot of data and general information on sports and development issues, while non-profit organisations work in the field and put specific projects into practice. The connection of these two groups and the mutual sharing of information and experience is far from a matter of course. We would like to start and further strengthen this debate within the project,” added the main project manager at UP, Arnošt Svoboda from FPC.

More information about the project can be found here.

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Fourth-generation Mössbauer spectrometers to be put into practice by a spin-off company

News: Faculty of Science - Fri, 06/08/2021 - 08:00

Palacký University Olomouc (UP) has taken a major step towards the commercialisation of the fourth-generation of Mössbauer spectrometers—instruments for analysing materials containing iron or iron oxides—developed by its scientists. Their manufacture, sale and servicing will be handled by a private spin-off company Iron Analytics under a licencing agreement. Among other things, the university will receive a share of each machine sold, whose average price can be half a million Czech crowns.

“The joint objective of the university and the newly formed spin-off company is to streamline the commercialisation of fourth-generation Mössbauer spectrometers. The university is the originator of both the idea and the technical solution; however, it is not its mission to directly provide and develop their production and sale. Spin-off companies are in general much more suitable for transferring research results into practice. Although they’re entering the market at a rather slow pace, compared to abroad, spin-offs are one of the most effective ways to ensure the transfer of knowledge from academia to practice,” said the Director of the Czech Advanced Technology and Research Institute—CATRIN UP, Pavel Banáš, who signed the licensing agreement for the university since these spectrometers are designed and manufactured there.

“On the basis of a transparent licensing agreement, preceded by a feasibility study carried out outside the university, alongside a conflict of interest agreement and expert opinion on the price of the licence, we can benefit from the university’s know-how, i.e., we can manufacture, sell and repair fourth-generation Mössbauer spectrometers. Since the university has so far managed to sell a few pieces of the device, we believe that after the launch of this spin-off company, we will be able to reach far higher numbers, at least dozens per year,” said one of the founders of Iron Analytics, Roman Jurečka.

The Mössbauer spectrometer is a laboratory instrument currently used in universities and research organisations. It is used to analyse materials that contain iron or iron oxides. “Mössbauer spectrometry has so far found applications primarily in the field of nanotechnology, but also in pharmacy, archaeology or mineralogy, for example. Our goal is to make effective use of these devices in industry, especially in the area of quality management. I believe that we will be successful and we can inspire other scientists at Palacký University,” said the Managing Director of Iron Analytics and the originator of the know-how, Jakub Navařík. Iron Analytics is a type of spin-off company with no ownership interest of the university.

The first Mössbauer spectrometer was developed at Palacký University in 1993 for the needs of its researchers. The next generation of the device was offered for commercial purposes a few years later. About a decade ago, Jakub Navařík developed a third generation as part of his dissertation work, focusing more, together with his colleagues, on commercializing the device. He created an improved fourth generation, the one being licensed now, this year. Mössbauer spectrometers from Olomouc have been previously sold to universities and research institutions in the US, China, South Korea, Germany, Poland, France, South Africa and other countries.

The UP Science and Technology Park (VTP) already has one spin-off company co-owned by the university—the RRR Centrum (a centre for the treatment of painful conditions and movement disorders, spol. s r.o). Regarding spin-off companies, another six entities have been established in the past to commercialize UP’s intellectual property. “The newly formed Iron Analytics is the first of its kind as it identifies itself as a UP spin-off,” said Petr Suchomel from VTP UP.

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New material for supercapacitors proves highly stable and eco-friendly

News: Faculty of Science - Wed, 04/08/2021 - 08:00

An eco-friendly electrode carbon material that can be used, thanks to its properties, in energy storage applications was developed by scientists from the Czech Advanced Technology and Research Institute (CATRIN), Palacký University Olomouc, and VSB—Technical University of Ostrava. The material proved its high capacitance and stability during supercapacitor testing.

“We managed to synthesize a new graphene derivative, on the surface of which we attached new functional groups. Thanks to our long experience with two-dimensional fluorographene chemistry, we were able to bind arginine, a type of amino acid, to the graphene sheet from both sides. By tuning the reaction conditions and adding a non-toxic, pore-forming agent—potassium carbonate—we achieved an optimal degree of functionalization and porosity in the material. These qualities make the material an excellent candidate for supercapacitor applications, for example,” said Veronika Šedajová, one of the authors of the study published in ChemSusChem.

A high capacitance of 390 F/g at a current density of 0.25 A/g was achieved by optimization of the properties. “We examined the applicability of the electrode material under typical operating conditions by testing the assembled supercapacitor for up to 30,000 charging/discharging cycles, with the material retaining over 82 percent of initial capacitance. Moreover, this work opens the door to an entirely new group of graphene derivatives with covalently bonded amino acids that can enable many applications, like energy storage or sensory applications,” confirmed another author Michal Otyepka.

Preparing eco-friendly electrochemically active electrode materials based on covalently functionalized graphene derivatives is a major challenge for scientists worldwide. These materials offer huge potential for energy storage applications. Covalent grafting of functional groups onto graphene’s surface, however, is challenging due to its low reactivity. This disadvantage can be circumvented by fluorographene chemistry. Researchers from CATRIN were able to capitalize upon their long-term research in this area. The team led by Michal Otyepka focuses on the 2D chemistry of fluorographene also thanks to the support of the European Research Council.

Categories: News from UP

Regime at UP from 1 August

News: Faculty of Science - Tue, 03/08/2021 - 15:18

At the beginning of August, new extraordinary government measures go into effect regarding the regime at universities. The majority will not change what are now customary habits; the biggest change concerns the validity of self-tests. We summarise them all below.

Teaching and exams

From 1st August until further notice, on the basis of the current government measure and its subsequent modification (in Czech), classes (i.e. special classes, incl. training and internships) can be held as they have been recently, without further restrictions.

For exams, state exams, academic ceremonies, entrance exams, and life-long learning courses, if there are more than 20 persons in attendance at any one moment, then the following go into effect:

  1. The only persons who may take part are those who are not showing any symptoms of Covid-19 and at the same time can prove/satisfy one of the following conditions:
    • proof of Covid-19 vaccination;
    • proof of having had Covid-19 in the past 180 days;
    • proof of the negative results of an antigen test (administered in the past 72 hours) or PCR test (administered in the past 7 days) from an official testing site;
    • undergoing a preventative antigen test intended for self-testing, on the spot, with a negative result – the option to carry out a self-test at home and provide a sworn statement to prove the result is no longer valid.
  2. The distance from the lecturer(s) must be a minimum of 2 metres.
  3. The maximum capacity for social events held indoors is 1000 people, for concerts, theatre, festivals, etc. it is 3000 visitors (100 % of the total seating capacity can be filled; all spectators must be seated).
  4. The maximum capacity for social events held outdoors is 2000 people, for concerts, theatres, festivals, etc. it is 7000 visitors (at the same time, the presence of participants must not exceed 1 standing participant per 2 m2).
  5. According to the emergency measure, the holding of a mass event with an expected attendance of more than 1 000 persons per day must be notified to the regional sanitary station (Krajská hygienická stanice, KHS) at least 5 days before the date of the event.
End of mandatory testing

As of 1 July, blanket testing of UP employees and students at faculties, dormitories, and other UP divisions will end. More detailed information

Wearing of respirators

According to the current rules (in Czech), one can remove one’s respirator or similar respiratory protection (e.g. nano-masks) in these situations:

  • at exams, if one keeps at least two metres’ distance between individual students and teachers;
  • during classes, if students are sitting at desks (lecturer(s) can also remove their respiratory protection);
  • at work, when there is no one else present but co-workers.

Athletes and people exercising can also remove their respiratory protection, as can persons in swimming pool areas, etc.; choirs when singing and throughout the duration of the event; inside one’s dormitory room; and customers at dining halls and UP Fresh Bistros when consuming food and drinks, if seated.

Please show consideration and mutual respect to your colleagues. Removing respiratory protection is only an option, not a requirement. If a student or employee feels any discomfort regarding the absence of respiratory protection in any of the above situations, we ask for collegial resolution of the situation and mutual agreement.

Categories: News from UP

Scientists have discovered a yet undescribed species of toad of the genus Atelopus in Panama

News: Faculty of Science - Tue, 27/07/2021 - 09:53

An as yet undescribed species of toad of the genus Atelopus was discovered during expeditions to inaccessible areas of the province of Darién in the eastern part of Panama by an international team of scientists, one of whose members was Milan Veselý from the Department of Zoology at the UP Faculty of Science. The report of their discovery was published in the prestigious journal Zoological Research. Toads of the genus Atelopus are among the most distinctive and remarkable groups of neotropical toads. At the same time, it is one of the most endangered groups of amphibians in the world, with a massive decline and even extinction in many populations over the last 20 years.

“We called the new species Atelopus fronterizo. The species moniker reflects the name given by indigenous peoples to someone who lives near the border. At the same time, however, they use this designation for members of the Panamanian border military police serving in Darién, who ensure security in this troubled part of Panama. Without the logistical support of this organisation, our research in some parts of Darién would be impossible,” said Veselý.

The habitat of the genus Atelopus extends from Costa Rica to Bolivia and currently includes 100 recognised species. Only six species occur in Panama, the last of which was described more than a quarter of a century ago. One of these species, the gold-coloured Atelopus zeteki, is not only the Panamanian national toad, but also an international symbol of the struggle to save amphibian populations in Latin America. “Given the ongoing deforestation, the destruction of native habitats and the ubiquitous chytrid fungus, it seemed unlikely that a hitherto undescribed species of these colourful and distinctive toads could still be found, which has not yet been discovered by herpetologists working in Panama. Nevertheless, during expeditions to inaccessible areas of Darién, we managed to discover several populations that were somewhat different in appearance from all the species described so far,” described Veselý.

Subsequent molecular analysis of the toad tissue samples showed that it was indeed a separate clade representing a new taxonomic unit. Researchers later found in a study of comparative material from world museums that this distinctive and colourful frog lay unnoticed by experts in the depositories of major museums for more than a hundred years. “This species was first found in 1911 near the settlement of Puerto Obaldía on the Panama-Colombian border by the naturalist Henri Pittier. This oldest known specimen stored in the United States National Museum was chosen by the herpetologist Dunn in 1931 as a paratype of the species Atelopus glyphus,” said Veselý.

Later finds of these toads turned out to be similar. Without much interest zoologists placed them in jars marked ‘Atelopus sp.’. “However, in an article published in 1990 by Cocroft et al. there is a mention of three male specimens, including a recording of their voices, which come from an older find by C.W. Myers in 1967. Toads were found in the settlement of Sasardí in the province of San Blas. Based on the bioacoustic analysis of the voice, the authors pointed out that these specimens may represent a hitherto undescribed species in the species complex Atelopus varius,” pointed out Veselý. In the last decade, some authors have presented this group of toads as Atelopus cf. limosus or Atelopus sp.

According to Veselý, it is no big surprise that the toads found were not accurately described for many decades. “Due to the large variability of colour patterns and morphometric features, it is very difficult to characterise the types of some species complexes in the genus Atelopus only on the basis of morphometry or colouration. Probably that is why this taxon remained undescribed for so long, although it was dealt with by the world’s leading herpetologists. Modern technologies, which are now used in integrative taxonomy, allow us to solve even such difficult taxonomic mysteries. Thanks to this, we managed to convincingly define the species not only molecularly, but also bioacoustically and morphologically,” said Veselý.

Currently, 97 percent of known species of toads of the genus Atelopus are classified as “endangered” (EN), “critically endangered” (CR) or “extinct” (EX) according to the IUCN Red List. “In the vast majority of identified cases, this widespread extinction was caused by chytridomycosis, which is a disease caused by the parasitic fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, which was discovered in Central America and is currently one of the causes of the global amphibian crisis,” said Veselý. From the genus Atelopus especially populations of toad species living at higher altitudes are being decimated by this disease. Of the Panamanian species, these include e.g. Atelopus zeteki, A. chiriquiensis, and A. varius.

Categories: News from UP

UP Faculty of Theology Volunteer: If we want our society to be healthy, we need to be friends

News: Faculty of Science - Mon, 19/07/2021 - 08:00

Not only the Covid-19 epidemic but also the recent natural disaster in South Moravia, devastated by a tornado, remind us how important is the work of volunteers – and how many such people who dedicate their time and energy to helping others are among the students and employees of Palacký University Olomouc. For some of them, volunteering is one of the meanings of life. This is the case of Marie Hanušová from the Sts Cyril and Methodius Faculty of Theology (UP CMFT).

Last year, the student of Charity and Social Work and vice-chairperson of the UP CMFT Academic Senate received the Rector’s Award for her volunteer work. When her nomination arrived at the UP Volunteering Centre at that time, it said that without her help, Opava Charity would not have been able to provide the necessary care to people who depended on it during the first wave of the epidemic. “I was so surprised. I don’t think my help was significantly greater in any way than anyone else’s. I was very pleased nonetheless,” said Hanušová.

As part of the home care service, she helped seniors with everyday situations they could no longer cope with on their own. She prepared their meals, helped them with dressing, hygiene, and cleaning, and did shopping for them. “Most of all, it was mentally challenging. Not that the clients were unpleasant, not at all. But in my daily contact with them, I was aware of how alone they were and how their loneliness had deepened considerably during the quarantine. In addition, I took care of several seniors I had known since I was a kid, and it was heart-breaking to see them so weak and infirm.”

Marie Hanušová, whom you can also meet at the UPoint information centre, has volunteering in her blood. Thanks to her parents, who have been actively engaged in Opava Charity, she has been helping others since childhood. As a child, for example, she helped clients in a home for the visually impaired to find things; later she helped out in a sheltered housing for people with mental illnesses, in a retirement home, and also helped organise a church fundraiser. Nowadays, she organises various events for children in her local parish, such as masquerade balls, camps, and trips, and she has also been active in scouting for about a dozen years.

“I have certainly more motivations for volunteering. One of them is the fact that I have two healthy arms and two healthy legs that can serve someone who is not so lucky. I often think about why I am on this planet and why I am here right now. Volunteering adds meaning and depth to my existence. I think it’s beautiful when someone can help a stranger just like that, selflessly. The word society – in Latin societas – is derived from from socius, which means a companion, a friend. If we want our society to be healthy, we need to be friends. And seeing the smiles of the people we have helped is just the icing on the cake,” said Hanušová, who is already thinking about what she will do after completing her Bachelor’s degree. On one hand, she would like to get a real job soon, but on the other hand, she would miss student life and the faculty very soon. However, she has still some time before making her decision.

 

There is still time to submit nominations for this year’s Rector’s Awards for UP Student and Staff Volunteers, which will be presented at the beginning of the new academic year. The UP Volunteering Centre is accepting nominations via this form until August 20. A candidate may be nominated for the award by the organisation the UP student or employee has volunteered for in the past academic year as well as by the UP Volunteering Centre or any other university workplace. You can read more about the fifth year of these annual awards here.

Categories: News from UP

Foreign students of the GLODEP programme from twenty-seven countries graduated from the Faculty of Science

News: Faculty of Science - Tue, 13/07/2021 - 08:00

Thirty-four graduates of the two-year masters programme International Development Studies – GLODEP from twenty-seven countries graduated in the auditorium of the Faculty of Science, and three additional students took part online. Seven graduates from last year also took part in the graduation ceremony, as ceremonies were not held in 2020 due to epidemic measures.

“Studying abroad was a big challenge for me. We had the opportunity to study in the Czech Republic, France, and Italy and meet people of different nationalities. I would like to use my experience in the future to work in government or elsewhere in the public sector. I would like to participate in the creation of legislative rules that would lead to an improvement in the situation in our country,” described Rafal Roshdy Ramadan Mohamed from Egypt.

Kazuma Yabe from Japan also intends to use his experience from his studies. “Thanks to interdisciplinary subjects, I was able to deepen my knowledge of development issues and at the same time expand my skills in quantitative analysis. I would like to apply the experience gained in development practice. At the same time, the friendships I made during my studies are important to me: they are for life.”

The Department of Development & Environmental Studies was in charge of organising graduations. “We did not want the parents and family members of graduating students to lose out on this exceptional social event. For the first time, we managed to organise graduations online. The livestream took place in real time all over the world. To date, over a thousand people have seen the broadcast,” said Simona Šafaříková, director of the programme at Palacký University.

This year’s graduations did not take place in robes for hygienic reasons. A unifying element was a special scarf with the student’s name and the GLODEP logo. “The students designed the scarves themselves and had them made in Ghana, where one of our students comes from. When the scarves were made, they were sent to each one separately. I was very pleased that all the students brought them to graduation, it looked very nice. It united an otherwise diverse group of people dressed in different formal wear,” added Šafaříková.

The GLODEP study programme offers students the opportunity to study at three European universities which implement programmes in the field of development studies and development economics. In addition to Palacký University, these are the University of Clermont Auvergne (France) and the University of Pavia (Italy). The aim of the programme is to prepare students for work in the field of development policies which contribute to solving current problems at international, national, and local levels. Non-European universities are also involved in the cooperation (i.e. the Royal University of Bhutan and the University of Hassan II Casablanca in Morocco).

Categories: News from UP

Mourning the passing of Tomáš Zábranský, UP alumnus and world expert in his field

News: Faculty of Science - Fri, 09/07/2021 - 14:47

Tomáš Zábranský, M.D., Ph.D, graduate of the UP Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, epidemiologist and addictionologist, one of the founders of the field of addictology in the Czech Republic, died at the age of 52 early this July. 
Tomáš Zábranský was born in 1969 in Hranice na Moravě. He graduated from the UP Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry in 1993 with a degree in General Medicine and received his doctorate from the same faculty in the field of epidemiology, hygiene, and preventive medicine. He also taught courses in drug abuse epidemiology for pre-graduate students at the Department of Public Health of our alma mater. 
His main research interests were drug abuse epidemiology and associated morbidity and mortality. He also dedicated himself to the study of legal and illegal drug markets and the evaluation of drug policies. In his final years he intensively devoted himself to the area of therapeutic use of cannabis and cannabinoids. He was one of the initiators and proponents of cannabis therapy here, and to a great degree was responsible for its adoption in the Czech Republic.
From 1999–2001, he was at the birth of the drug information system in the Czech Republic and the foundation of the National Monitoring Centre for Drugs and Addiction. He was the lead investigator of the PAD study, which Investigated the impacts of revisions in drug legislation in the Czech Republic after 1998, the result of which led to recodification of criminal drug offenses in the new criminal law statutes of 2009.
From 2003–2004 was in the USA on a Hubert H. Humphrey Fellowship at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and was also a collaborating researcher at the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) and the RAND Drug Policy Research Center think tank.
In 2005, he was at the founding of the field of addictology and the Department of Addictology (originally the Addictology Centre), at the First Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague and the General University Hospital in Prague, where he also taught.
He was the head of the ResAd research and advisory group and worked throughout the world as an expert on introducing systems of monitoring drug situations and modifications of drug policies. He was especially active in Eastern Europe and Central Asia (the BUMAD, SCAD, CADAP projects). He worked with UN agencies, and in Europe especially with the European Monitoring Centre for Drugs and Drug Addiction (EMCDDA), where he also was a member of its advisory board since 2016, nominated by the European Parliament. 
He was the main organiser of the international conferences Urban Drug Policy (2009) and Medical Cannabis Conference 2015. He also took part in the foundation and operations of the International Cannabis and Cannabinoids Institute (ICCI) in Prague.
From 2006–2016, he served as an external advisor to members of the Czech government – ministers Ivan Langer and Svatopluk Němeček, and prime minister Bohuslav Sobotka.
He was the author of more than a hundred publications in peer-reviewed journals and monographs and the author of two scientific books. He was the deputy editor of the impact journal Harm Reduction Journal, a member of the editorial board of the impact journal Journal of Drug Issues and the Czech scientific journal Adiktologie, and also a member of several Czech professional associations, the International Think Tank for Analysis of Drug Policy (UK) and the Independent Reference Group to the United Nations on HIV and Injecting Drug Use.
His other interests included translation, modern and classical music, literature, and photography. From 1993–98 he translated 22 books of prose and fiction from English into Czech, most often in tandem with UP alumnus David Záleský; the duo received the national Jungmann Prize for Translation for their inventive translation of John Lennon’s Skywriting by Word of Mouth (Nanebepění).
In 2017 he suffered an injury, from whose repercussions he never fully recovered.
Tomáš Zábranský made an indelible mark in the field of addictology in the Czech Republic, he was highly active and prominent in the field internationally, and significantly contributed to making Czech addictology and drug abuse epidemiology visible on the international level.
His legacy lives on!

Doc. MUDr. Viktor Mravčík, Ph.D., fellow student, close friend and fellow co-worker, head of the National Monitoring Centre for Drugs and Addiction
Doc. MUDr. Helena Kollárová, Ph.D., head of the Department of Public Health, UP Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry

Categories: News from UP

Experientia Foundation to support young scientist from the Faculty of Science

News: Faculty of Science - Fri, 09/07/2021 - 11:04

Soňa Krajčovičová from the Faculty of Science is one of this year’s two grant recipients from the Experientia Foundation of the Dvořák couple. The foundation supports young scientists in the field of organic, bioorganic and medicinal chemistry on Czech and foreign internships. The talented scientist has recently travelled for a one-year internship to the University of Cambridge, where she wants to focus on a methodology which will make it possible to prepare multifunctional compounds for the development of a new generation of targeted drugs.

“Receiving the grant means a lot to me, both personally and professionally. It’s a great opportunity that only a few ever get, so I appreciate it all the more. Mr and Mrs Dvořák are fine people, I have been admiring them for many years for what they do for Czech science. At the same time, however, they are very modest and down-to-earth, which is an almost unheard of phenomenon these days. The Experientia Foundation scholarship is a very prestigious affair and in our field it is often the only way a young scientist can look to going abroad after completing their doctoral studies in order to gain necessary scientific experience. That is why I am very glad that I could be one of the awarded scholarship holders this year,” said Krajčovičová.

Soňa Krajčovičová’s project is based on the preparation of spatially locked peptide compounds, which will use the method of ‘stapling’ the peptide to introduce several useful substances into the molecule, such as small organic molecules. This will allow the preparation of multifunctional, biologically interesting compounds. “In the project, I came up with some ideas on how to prepare these substances. It looks simple at first glance, but these are really very complex organic compounds, which usually bring complications in synthesis with them. However, it is a creative challenge for me, and I enjoy challenges,” described the award-winning scientist in the field of organic chemistry.

Soňa Krajčovičová received a scholarship worth 945,000 CZK (37,000 euros) from the Experientia Foundation, thanks to which she will complete a one-year internship abroad at the University of Cambridge in Great Britain, where she has been working in the group under Prof David Spring since July of this year. “Beginnings are difficult everywhere, but I believe I will quickly integrate into the group. I have respect for this prestigious university and certainly am not taking this opportunity for granted. I will try to spread not only the good name of the Experientia Foundation, but also that of the Department of Organic Chemistry at the Palacký University Faculty of Science,” added Krajčovičová.

Categories: News from UP

Each of us should be responsible: A reminder from the UP Rector, with wishes for a beautiful summer

News: Faculty of Science - Fri, 02/07/2021 - 11:30

Dear colleagues and students,

The end of the summer semester is nearing, one which was again drastically influenced by the ongoing Covid-19 pandemic. I would like to thank all of you for how you coped with this unusual situation and how thanks to your service, enthusiasm, and conscientiousness, we managed to get through another non-traditional semester – all the way to its successful end. I believe that next semester we will again greet each other at the university face to face; however to do so, each of us must contribute their own dose of responsibility.

The holidays are before us, and many of us will be travelling at home and abroad. I hope that you will soak up a much-deserved rest after the difficult year of Covid. At the same time, as a doctor and rector, I have one important request: let’s please continue to be responsible, and not succumb to a general happy feeling that we have the pandemic safely behind us.

The number of infected people has been slowly rising in recent days and the devious delta mutation leads us to believe that Covid-19 is something that we will encounter for some time to come. And it is already clear that how the university will fare in the autumn must depend upon how we approach the situation now: in the summer. It is entirely up to us.

This is why for these months and the months to come, we have decided to launch the campaign Responsible Palacký. And I would be enormously happy if everyone of us became “responsible Palackýs”. We can distil the main message into five points:

  1. For anyone who can, please get vaccinated. It’s the only way to strengthen our collective immunity.
  2. If it is not possible to get fully vaccinated during the summer, remember that it is necessary after returning from our holidays and before returning to work to get tested for Covid-19, and to follow all the rules and recommendations of our own Ministry of Health and those abroad.
  3. Let’s wear face masks wherever it is necessary, both at the university (aside from one’s own office) and away from the university.
  4. Let us not underestimate any symptoms of respiratory trouble.
  5. Let’s not forget that one of the most effective and simplest tactics in the fight against Covid-19 is to maintain the sensible measures of:
    • hand sanitising;
    • face masks;
    • distance (at least 2 metres);
    • common sense;
    • mutual respect.

Let’s all contribute, in order not to have to repeat last year’s scenario, and do all that we can so that we can return to university life in September: the way it used to be, and which we have missed so much. Let’s try to sensibly maintain the anti-epidemic measures and to communicate their importance to others. Let’s motivate others to be as responsible as we are. And as to whether we begin the winter semester in person or online, it really all depends on whether we are able to keep our summer merrymaking within sensible limits.

Many thanks for your cooperation, and that together, we will further the responsible reputation of the Palacký University Olomouc community.

Respectfully,

Martin Procházka

Categories: News from UP

Each of us should be responsible: A reminder from the UP Rector, with wishes for a beautiful summer

News: Faculty of Science - Fri, 02/07/2021 - 11:30

Dear colleagues and students,

The end of the summer semester is nearing, one which was again drastically influenced by the ongoing Covid-19 pandemic. I would like to thank all of you for how you coped with this unusual situation and how thanks to your service, enthusiasm, and conscientiousness, we managed to get through another non-traditional semester – all the way to its successful end. I believe that next semester we will again greet each other at the university face to face; however to do so, each of us must contribute their own dose of responsibility.

The holidays are before us, and many of us will be travelling at home and abroad. I hope that you will soak up a much-deserved rest after the difficult year of Covid. At the same time, as a doctor and rector, I have one important request: let’s please continue to be responsible, and not succumb to a general happy feeling that we have the pandemic safely behind us.

The number of infected people has been slowly rising in recent days and the devious delta mutation leads us to believe that Covid-19 is something that we will encounter for some time to come. And it is already clear that how the university will fare in the autumn must depend upon how we approach the situation now: in the summer. It is entirely up to us.

This is why for these months and the months to come, we have decided to launch the campaign Responsible Palacký. And I would be enormously happy if everyone of us became “responsible Palackýs”. We can distil the main message into five points:

  1. For anyone who can, please get vaccinated. It’s the only way to strengthen our collective immunity.
  2. If it is not possible to get fully vaccinated during the summer, remember that it is necessary after returning from our holidays and before returning to work to get tested for Covid-19, and to follow all the rules and recommendations of our own Ministry of Health and those abroad.
  3. Let’s wear face masks wherever it is necessary, both at the university (aside from one’s own office) and away from the university.
  4. Let us not underestimate any symptoms of respiratory trouble.
  5. Let’s not forget that one of the most effective and simplest tactics in the fight against Covid-19 is to maintain the sensible measures of:
    • hand sanitising;
    • face masks;
    • distance (at least 2 metres);
    • common sense;
    • mutual respect.

Let’s all contribute, in order not to have to repeat last year’s scenario, and do all that we can so that we can return to university life in September: the way it used to be, and which we have missed so much. Let’s try to sensibly maintain the anti-epidemic measures and to communicate their importance to others. Let’s motivate others to be as responsible as we are. And as to whether we begin the winter semester in person or online, it really all depends on whether we are able to keep our summer merrymaking within sensible limits.

Many thanks for your cooperation, and that together, we will further the responsible reputation of the Palacký University Olomouc community.

Respectfully,

Martin Procházka

Categories: News from UP

Workshop will reveal organization and functioning of genetic information in plants

News: Faculty of Science - Thu, 01/07/2021 - 08:00

Scientists and students dealing with plant hereditary information will meet in Olomouc in mid-September at The Czech Plant Nucleus Workshop 2021. The meeting, which aims to share the latest scientific knowledge, will take place September 14 - 15 in Fort Science. Registration has already started.

 

This is the first workshop in the Czech Republic, which will bring together experts focused on studying the cell nucleus and chromosomes. At this two-day meeting, they will have a unique opportunity to establish contacts and collaboration.

 

"At the workshop, we will address the issue of plant genetic information, which is the control center of the cell. For example, we will deal with how this center can turn thousands of genes on and off, or how it recognizes that it has been damaged and can repair itself on the fly," says one of the organizers Aleš Pečinka from the Institute of Experimental Botany, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic and the Center of the Region Haná for Biotechnological and Agricultural Research.

 

According to him, this knowledge is key not only for a deeper knowledge of the world of plants and further research, but can also play a crucial role in the future in breeding of more resistant plants with new properties.

 

The workshop is organized by a group of scientists from the Institute of Experimental Botany of ASCR, the Biological Center of the ASCR, Masaryk University and Charles University. Interested professionals and students may register by July 24, 2021 on olomouc.ueb.cas.cz/en/cpnw2021, where detailed information can also be found.

Categories: News from UP

Borreliosis – “the great new imitator” can be an insidious enemy in disguise

News: Faculty of Science - Tue, 29/06/2021 - 15:30

Researchers from the Institute of Social Health at Sts Cyril and Methodius Faculty of Theology at Palacký University Olomouc have studied the effects of Lyme disease, also known as borreliosis. They investigated three dozen people who have undergone the disease and focussed primarily on the experiences of patients who evaluated the course of the illness, the intricacies of the diagnosis, and the possibilities of both conventional and experimental treatment. Videos, patients’ experiences, and resources for physicians and patients are posted on www.hovoryozdravi.cz. The research was carried out thanks to a project supported by the Technology Agency of the Czech Republic (TACR).

“The issue of Lyme disease is an extremely interesting one. This disease (whose causative agent, the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato, is a close relative of Treponema palidum, the causative agent of syphilis) is sometimes referred to as “the great new imitator”. This multisystemic disease can attack a wide range of tissues and organs and thus mimic the symptoms of other diseases. What makes the disease tricky is that its manifestations are varied, often non-specific, and fluctuate in intensity. The specific symptoms of the initial phase are absent in many patients, and diagnosing the disease on the basis of other symptoms and antibodies persisting in the blood for a long time is often difficult,” said researcher Veronika Navrátilová.

Borreliosis: a disease with a significant socio-economic impact

The disease can be successfully treated with antibiotics in most cases. However, it turns out that 5–20% of patients continue to have health problems even after treatment. They end up on sick leave or even on partial or full disability pension. If borreliosis is not treated by a timely and appropriate response, it is non-fatal but nonetheless a disabling disease.

Cases of borreliosis with complications are a complex and not yet fully understood issue. Patients often find themselves in a tricky situation – they often feel very sick, but doctors cannot objectively find anything other than antibodies to borreliosis. “Indirect diagnostics cannot give an unequivocal answer as to whether there is an ongoing infection or just lasting antibodies,” Navrátilová pointed out.

Veronika Navrátilová studied sociology at Palacký University Olomouc. In addition to her alma mater, she taught at the Department of Medical Ethics and Humanities at the Second Faculty of Medicine of Charles University. She gained experience in qualitative research at the Confess Research agency in Prague. She is currently studying in the doctoral programme of the Institute of Social Health (OUSHI, a research institute at Sts Cyril and Methodius Faculty of Theology). She is interested in the sociology of health, illness, and medicine, and in qualitative research focussing on the experiences of doctors and patients.

The clarification of those cases where treatment does not work or post-treatment syndrome develops after the disease is gone has been the subject of many scientific studies in recent years. Some infections (including borreliosis) appear to trigger immunopathological processes that cause long-term health problems.

“The question whether something called ‘chronic borreliosis’ exists is still very controversial. Societies for infectious diseases around the world are generally opposed to the term; however, entire alternative communities of doctors and patient groups are forming to convince the authorities otherwise and to enforce adequate care for people affected by this disease,” Navrátilová added.

What does it mean to have borreliosis? (Un)complicated diagnoses and health problems

The researchers analysed data from 39 interviews with respondents who were contacted at professional and patient conferences, through specialised Lyme disease outpatient clinics at infectious disease wards in hospitals, as well as through various discussion forums and social media groups bringing together people with borreliosis.

“Our research focussed both on cases of ‘uncomplicated’ borreliosis and on patients who describe themselves as ‘chronic’. We recorded the experiences of people with a variety of disease courses and manifestations, with varying lengths of time before diagnosis was made, and varying levels of successful treatment. We spoke to people who had tried other options in addition to standard treatment and had been treated even by private doctors or abroad. Some of our respondents have won their battle with the disease and are enjoying full health. Others, however, are still struggling with persistent health problems, some even with the fear that life will never be the same as it was before the disease. We believe that those people too should have somewhere to turn for help and support in the hope of a full recovery or at least alleviation of debilitating health issues,” said Navrátilová.

A module on Lyme disease, presenting topics that research has shown to be relevant to patients, will be a source of information not only for patients and their families, but also for medical students, general practitioners, and other professionals. The module will include three hundred video and audio clips – excerpts from interviews obtained as part of the research – which will be posted on the website www.hovoryozdravi.cz. Subsequently, the team will present the research results to the professional community in articles submitted to medical journals.

“The main contribution of our research is that we have looked at a serious and relatively common disease, for which medicine still does not have clear-cut solutions, through the eyes of patients. We have thus learnt how they perceive the illness, what they believe, and what they need. This information is crucial for the increasingly implemented ‘patient-centred design’ of medical care. We hope that patients will find the research outputs helpful by sharing their experiences. And last but not least, our research will convey information to both existing and future doctors about what it is like to have borreliosis, how patients really feel, and what they have to face. Our data can help doctors in how to deal with patients, how to inform them about the disease, how to support them. So this is something that we – sociologists and psychologists who are involved in this kind of research – can contribute to,” Navrátilová concluded.

The research was carried out within the TACR project No. TL02000257 “Life quality support for people with Lyme disease”. Interviews with 39 patients were conducted from April 2019 to September 2020. The application guarantors of the project were the Department of Immunology at the UP Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University Hospital Olomouc, and the patients’ association Borelioza.cz. The expert guarantor of the project was Professor of Immunology Evžen Weigl.

Lyme disease is the most common tick-borne infection in the Czech Republic and the most common disease transmitted from animals to humans in Europe, Asia, and North America. It is caused by the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato. The infection is not only transmitted by adult ticks but also in their younger developmental stages. Transmission by insects and other arthropods has not yet been proven. The likelihood of infection increases with the length of time the tick feeds on the blood. Research shows that at least 24 hours of the tick being attached is required for transmission to occur. The exact incidence of borreliosis in the country is unknown; in many cases recovery occurs without the need to prescribe special treatment. In total, 4–5 thousand cases are reported annually. The most common and most typical manifestation of the disease is migratory erythema – a characteristic spot on the skin, most often localised around the site of the tick’s attachment. In addition to skin manifestations, borreliosis can often affect the musculoskeletal and nervous systems; rarely even the eyes and heart may be affected. There is no effective vaccine against borreliosis on the market to date. However, a new vaccine was recently developed and successfully tested in several countries, and the results are promising.

The website hovoryozdravi.cz (i.e. Talking About Health) was created thanks to collaboration between the Institute of Social Health and the Health Experiences Research Group at the University of Oxford based on DIPEx research. This method is based on in-depth qualitative interviews. The site presents patients’ experiences and provides reliable and scientifically validated information about health problems. They publish research findings on ageing, breast cancer, palliative care, epilepsy in children, and hearing impairment in children.

Categories: News from UP

Please participate in the survey Impact of the COVID-19 Pandemic on University Students

News: Faculty of Science - Mon, 28/06/2021 - 14:51

The COVID-19 pandemic has affected all aspects of our lives, and we will be dealing with its effects for many years to come. Czech higher education is no exception in this respect. The Ministry of Education of the Czech Republic is kindly asking students to participate in a survey to help gather information about the situation in higher education during the COVID-19 pandemic.

The survey is intended for students of public and private universities in the Czech Republic in all types of study programmes (i.e. Bachelor’s, follow-up Master’s, Master’s and doctoral study programmes). The survey is divided into two parts. The main goal of the first part is to obtain information about your views on study and living conditions during the COVID-19 pandemic. The second part contains questions that will help us to better evaluate the results of the survey.

The questionnaire is fully ANONYMOUS. It is not possible to identify anyone through any of the questions; however we will leave it up to you to decide whether you want to provide us with the data in the second part of the questionnaire. At the same time, we emphasise that the aim of the survey is NOT to evaluate individual universities, but to gain a general view of the situation in the field of higher education during the COVID-19 pandemic. It will take about 5 minutes to complete the questionnaire. 

The survey will be open until 16 July 2021.

Thank you for your time!

Online questionnaire

Categories: News from UP

Scientists develop first lead-free perovskite luminescent solar concentrator

News: Faculty of Science - Thu, 24/06/2021 - 08:00

The first transparent luminescent solar concentrator (LSC) based on lead-free perovskite nanocrystals was developed by scientists from the Czech Advanced Technology and Research Institute (CATRIN) in collaboration with colleagues from University of Erlangen–Nuremberg, Germany; Brno University of Technology;  and VSB – Technical University of Ostrava. The unique solution overcomes the disadvantages of the existing perovskite solar energy devices, namely the presence of lead and low stability.

Luminescent solar concentrators (LSCs) are devices capable of absorbing sunlight and concentrating it at their edges, where it is subsequently converted into electrical energy by means of a built-in solar cell. “The main idea behind the whole LSCs concept is energy self-sufficient buildings, where their generally large glass areas are efficiently used to generate electricity. Thanks to the highly luminescent and colloidally stable perovskite nanocrystals developed in our Photoelectrochemistry group, we were able to construct a sufficiently transparent solar concentrator that resembles a classical window with its parameters,” explained the study’s correspondent author Štěpán Kment. The article was published by the Journal of the American Chemical Society—ACS Applied Energy Materials.

Another major advantage of the new LSC is the absence of lead, which is still dominantly used in this type of perovskite nanocrystals and brings significant environmental and health complications. “For this new type of LSC, we have achieved very promising efficiencies and good photostability. This work was possible mainly due to the excellent domestic and foreign cooperation with our colleagues from University of Erlangen–Nuremberg, Germany, and Brno University of Technology. My big thanks also go to the Endowment Fund of Palacký University, which largely funded my stay in Erlangen in Professor Schmuki and Professor Brabec’s group,” said the first author of the paper and Ph.D. student of physical chemistry at the Faculty of Science of UP Lukáš Zdražil.

The research team also drew on their experience with the LSC design from last year. The authors then used a different kind of luminescent 0D nanomaterials—carbon dots—to produce tandem LSC. The results were published by Nanoscale.

Luminescent solar concentrators are a major step to creating a sustainable and renewable network of photovoltaic power plants embedded in glass-walled areas of urban buildings. This could contribute to increasing the use of solar energy without unnecessary interference with the landscape.

Categories: News from UP

Shanghai Ranking 2022: UP tops Czech universities in Material Sciences again

News: Faculty of Science - Wed, 23/06/2021 - 13:00

For the sixth time Palacký University Olomouc has been included in the international university ranking by Quacquarelli Symonds. In the current edition of the QS World University Rankings 2022, UP is ranked in 601st–650th place; among the top 5 universities domestically. The Olomouc university has also been listed in this year’s Shanghai Ranking, which ranks global universities by subjects. UP has successfully defended its first place domestically in Material Sciences.

The organisers of the QS World University Rankings, one of the most prestigious rankings in the world, assessed 1,673 universities this year and featured 1,300 of them in the publication. Universities were evaluated according to six metrics. The greatest importance (40%) is given to Academic Reputation; other indicators include Employer Reputation (10%), Faculty/Student Ratio (20%), Citations per Faculty (20%), International Faculty Ratio (5%), and International Student Ratio (5%). Compared to previous year (591st–600th position), UP has slightly dropped, but 300 universities were added to this year’s ranking.

UP saw a slight rise in the ranking of International Student Ratio (552nd this year, 557th last year), whereas it fell in International Faculty Ratio (430th last year, 601st this year) and Faculty/Student Ratio (366th last year, 416th this year).

 

Rankings: a tool for strategic management

According to Michal Malacka, Vice-Rector for Strategy and External Relations, international rankings are – despite certain reservations – part of the university’s strategic management. “For example, QS and THE, as the world’s most renowned rankings, receive great attention and inspire responses at universities, among employers, and in political circles. They can often be an impetus for various intensive ‘excellence initiatives’ to improve ranking positions, and sometimes are reflected in the national strategy and legislative changes. Whether we like it or not, we must not allow ourselves to miss the boat. Therefore, my thanks go to all those who understand the need to secure the evaluation processes and contribute to positive results,” said Malacka with regard to the latest achievement.

 

 

A total of 15 domestic universities can be found in the QS ranking this year, three times more than three years ago. In a year-on-year comparison, however, most of them are worse off. The best university in domestic rankings is Charles University in Prague, followed by the University of Chemistry and Technology in Prague, Czech Technical University in Prague, and by Masaryk University in Brno. As in previous years, the world ranking is led by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). The overall scores are available at QS World University Rankings 2022: Top Global Universities | Top Universities.

“Every evaluation, every ranking has its merits but also its limitations. We need to learn to read the data from the rankings in an effective way and be able to exploit them, and at the same time implement an efficient data collection process. Academic management needs to be prepared to work with appropriate indexes and indicators so that we do not get isolated with respect to future developments due to being unacquainted with the environment. It is also necessary to have appropriate system tools at hand and know how to use them,” the Vice-Rector added.

 

First place in the material and agricultural sciences

By contrast, the Global Ranking of Academic Subject, published by the Shanghai Ranking, examines 54 fields related to the natural sciences, life sciences, medical sciences, and social sciences. The resulting ranking includes 1,800 universities from 93 countries, including eleven institutions from the Czech Republic.

Among Czech schools, Charles University was the best, being listed in the rankings of 22 subjects. Masaryk University was listed in eleven and Palacký University in seven subjects. The best ranking of the oldest Moravian university from Olomouc was achieved in Agricultural Sciences: the 151st-200th place in the world, sharing domestic superiority with the Czech University of Life Sciences Prague. As last year, UP also holds the first position in the domestic ranking in Material Science & Engineering, where it is ranked 301st to 400th in world competition. UP occupies the same position globally also in Ecology, whereas in Physics it ranks 201st to 300th. UP is in the top 100 in Chemistry and Public Health, and unlike the previous year, it was not listed in Biological Sciences. You can read more here.

Categories: News from UP

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